Molecular genetics of cuticle formation in Prunus

Molecular genetics of cuticle formation in Prunus

Molecular genetics of cuticle formation in Prunus

During growth, the fruit surface of sweet cherry, Prunus avium, expands rapidly whilst only a relatively small amount of new cuticular material is produced, often leading to the formation of microscopic cracks in the cuticle that can reduce fruit quality. Alkio et al. perform RNA-Seq and bioinformatic analyses to identify genes expressed in the skin of developing fruit, and relate gene expression with cuticle deposition. The results suggest that downregulation of genes involved in cuticle deposition occurs early in fruit development, and a number of candidate genes are proposed for further investigation.

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One thought on “Molecular genetics of cuticle formation in Prunus

  1. Interesting. I am wondering if the downregulation of cuticle deposition is considered a norm for the sweet cherry. If so, what would be the evolutionary benefit? Is it possible that the cracks in the cuticle help attract potential organisms, like rodents, that would help spread the seeds through ingestion.

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