Annals of Botany

Style polymorphism in Nivenia (Iridaceae)

Nivenia (Iridiceae)

Heterostyly is widely distributed among the angiosperms, but detailed studies are limited to few taxonomic groups. Sánchez et al. (pp. 321–331) ascertain the presence of different stigma height polymorphisms among species of Nivenia, formerly considered either as monomorphic or distylous. Comparisons of the degree of reciprocity, pollen transfer and floral integration give results that are consistent with the hypothesis that pollinators are the main driving force behind the evolution of heterostyly.

About the author

Editor Pat Heslop-Harrison

Pat Heslop-Harrison is Professor of Molecular Cytogenetics and Cell Biology at the University of Leicester. He is also Chief Editor of Annals of Botany.

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  • Super talk on evolutionary transitions in pollination systems from Spencer Barrett, at the International Congress for Sexual Plant Reproduction in Bristol, this morning. This work, with particular models from tristylous, distylous and monomorphic Eichhornia (water hyacinths) , and from monoecious and dioecious Sagittaria. Careful analysis shows what happens at range edges – very different from the centres – and shows which strategies are dead ends, which one-way routes, and which might be evolutionarily most important. Spencer is one of the most regular contributors to Annals of Botany and has published much related work with us:

    Ai-Min Li, Xiao-Qin Wu, Dian-Xiang Zhang, and Spencer C. H. Barrett Cryptic dioecy in Mussaenda pubescens (Rubiaceae): a species with stigma-height dimorphism
    Ann. Bot., Advance Access published on July 19, 2010; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcq146

    Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants SPECIALIZATION AND GENERALIZATION IN PLANT-POLLINATOR INTERACTIONS:
    Jannice Friedman and Spencer C. H. Barrett
    Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants
    Ann. Bot., June 2009; 103: 1515 – 1527.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcp035

    Modification of flower architecture during early stages in the evolution of self-fertilization :
    Mario Vallejo-Marín and Spencer C. H. Barrett
    Modification of flower architecture during early stages in the evolution of self-fertilization
    Ann. Bot., April 2009; 103: 951 – 962.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcp015